Classes & Events
Global Day of Jewish Learning

Global Day of Jewish Learning

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Schechter Manhattan, 805 Columbus Ave, NY 10025

Theme: Beauty and Ugliness

Description | Teachers and Sessions | Kids' Programming 

Listen to Recordings and Read Source Sheets Here

Hosted by:
 

 

Event Description

Hadar, Schechter Manhattan, Shaare Zedek, and LimmudNY will be hosting a Global Day of Jewish Learning on Sunday, November 12, 2017, at the Solomon Schechter School of Manhattan, on 100th and Columbus, from 9:45am-3:00pm.

Join with more than 400 communities in 48 countries and 6 continents for a day of Torah study. For a schedule of the day, please see below. In addition to the teaching sessions, there will dedicated space for chevruta learning as well as childrens' programming

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be available for purchase between 11:50 am and 2:30 pm. Recordings of sessions are available here.

 

2017 Schedule 

 

9:45am Welcome and Opening Remarks
10am

What is Holiness?

Dr. Benjamin Sommer

Jewish Theological Seminary

Mean Girls at Work: Reimagining Sarai and Hagar

Dana Levinson Steiner

NYU Bronfman Center

Blessings for the Good, Bad and the Ugly

Elan Margulies

Hazon

11am

The Art and Jewish esthetic of Mark Rothko

R. Michael Paley

UJA-Federation of New York

Hallel Without A Bracha: How Do We Celebrate Israel?

Rabbi Jonah Geffen

Shaare Zedek

Taking Mikveh Out of the Basement

Sheridan Gayer

ImmerseNYC

Towards Astonishing Beauty: How Prayer Lifts us up and Opens our Eyes

Rabbi Dianne Cohler-Esses

Romemu

 11:50am Lunch Break
12:15pm

Why did R. Nahman permit Yalta to be carried on a palanquin on a festival? A New Reading of Bavli Besah 25b

Professor Judith Hauptman

Ohel Ayala

A Jewish Legal approach to Greenhouse Gasses?

David Eber

SAJ

Is Poverty Ugly?

Eliyahu Freedman

Avodah

1:15pm

Traditional Prayer: Difficulties and Opportunities

Zvi Hirschfeld

Pardes

It's hard to raise parents: on learning from each other

Michal Kohane

Yeshivat Maharat

I'm an Atheist and I Believe in God

Dan Ross

Columbia/Barnard Hillel

Getting Angry with God

Shayna Golkow

Park Avenue Synagogue

2:15pm

What Goes Down Must Come Up: A New Map of Spiritual Progress

Dena Weiss

Hadar

Defining "need" in the wake of disaster

Joe Gindi

AJWS

Instant A Cappella

Daniel Henkin

Tizmoret

 

2017 Class Descriptions

 

Rabbi Dianne Cohler-Esses— Towards Astonishing Beauty: How Prayer Lifts us up and Opens our Eyes

Jewish prayer functions to shape our consciousness so that our inner lives come to resemble the intentions of our heart. We will look at specific examples of how liturgy can enable us to see and experience the astonishing beauty underlying existence. In this session we will look at morning prayers to illustrate this concept.

Jump back to the full schedule

David EberA Jewish Legal approach to Greenhouse Gasses?

The Rabbis could have never imagined a problem like Climate Change. Ironically, it is by reading rabbinic texts on laws of neighbors; meant for people living in immediate proximity in which we can begin to see a possible Jewish legal approach to addressing greenhouse gasses, a problem of a global scale. In this class we will examine texts from the rabbinic to the contemporary periods of history which speak about topics as diverse as shooting arrows at your neighbor's property, property rights, to smoking, and we will ask the question of what actions for us might be generated from our study.

Jump back to the full schedule

Eliyahu FreedmanIs Poverty Ugly?

How do the Rabbis view the impoverished and poverty itself? An exploration of texts and stories from the field of food stamps advocacy with an Avodah alum will frame the conversation.

Jump back to the full schedule

Sheridan GayerTaking Mikveh Out of the Basement

There's a movement afoot to re-imagine the mikveh (Jewish ritual bath) ritual as a way for all Jews to honor the sacred nature of our bodies and experiences. Our community can now immerse for weddings, births, healing from illness or trauma, significant birthdays, b'nei mitzvah, divorce, pregnancy loss, fertility struggles, mourning, or spiritual preparation for High Holidays. Come learn about the ancient ritual of mikveh and how the trained volunteer mikveh guides at ImmerseNYC are facilitating transformative, powerful rituals for our community.

Jump back to the full schedule

Shayna Golkow— Getting Angry with God

Our lives hold both beauty and ugliness, so in order for prayer to feel authentic, we need space to express a full range of emotions. Analyzing a few psalms and contemporary prayers, we will attempt to open up our own potential for expressing anger, sadness, and disappointment with God.

Jump back to the full schedule

Rabbi Jonah GeffenHallel Without A Bracha: How Do We Celebrate Israel?

The founding of the State of Israel is a modern Jewish miracle, but it is an event of both religious and secular significance. A party at the boat basin is fun and makes a lot of sense, but how then are we to commemorate Israel religiously?

Jump back to the full schedule

Joe GindiDefining "need" in the wake of disaster

In the wake of natural and human disasters our impulse is to provide for basic needs of food, shelter, and security. While this is an important first step, elements within the laws of charity might push us to consider a broader understanding of need. In this session we will place talmudic conceptions of charity in dialogue with an emerging "rights-based" approach to disaster response and recovery. We'll use real stories of disaster relief to evaluate the policy implications of the Talmud's expanded definition of need.

Jump back to the full schedule

Professor Judith HauptmanWhy did R. Nahman permit Yalta to be carried on a palanquin on a festival? A New Reading of Bavli Besah 25b

Transport on a palanquin on a festival is prohibited and yet the Talmud reports that R. Nahman permitted Yalta, his wife, to be carried on one on a festival. We will examine what the short, halakhic anecdotes in the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds have to say on the subject. And maybe offer a new interpretation as to why this rule was changed. Text handouts in Hebrew and English.

Jump back to the full schedule

Daniel HenkinInstant A Cappella!

Jump into the world of contemporary Jewish a cappella singing and create an instant choir with your Global Day of Jewish Learning friends! Some singing experience is recommended and it is helpful if you are able to sight-read music, although neither is required.

Jump back to the full schedule

R. Zvi HerschfeldTraditional Prayer: Difficulties and Opportunities

Together we will explore the evolution of prayer fro the Biblical to the Rabbinic model, and how this transition addressed existing challenges and crated new ones. We will explore texts that both address these difficulties and some approaches to using them as opportunities for growth

Jump back to the full schedule

Michal KohaneIt's hard to raise parents: on learning from each other

Rabbi Akiva as a parent and Insights about acceptance, change, women's roles and more.

Jump back to the full schedule

Dana Levinson SteinerMean Girls at Work: Reimagining Sarai and Hagar

While the topic of gender equity continues to find a more public voice in 2017, a darker issue continues to prevail: female rivalry. As workplace culture can fail to provide an equal playing field for women, women find themselves set up to compete against one another, perpetuating a cycle that has existed for millennia: the mean girl. What does our Jewish tradition say about the mean girl, and how can we reimagine her to be more than the conditions she's stacked against? In this session, we'll explore the origins of the mean girl in Sarai & Hagar, and how we reimagine female workplace bonds.

Jump back to the full schedule

Elan MarguliesBlessings for the Good, Bad and the Ugly

Blessings ask us to slow down and give thanks and can help cultivate a feeling of perpetual amazement. Jewish tradition has blessings for wonderfully fragrant fruit, seeing the ocean and even for seeing an exceptionally strange creature. Together we will explore a selection of blessings to give thanks for the good, the bad and the ugly.

Jump back to the full schedule

R. Michael Paley The Art and Jewish esthetic of Mark Rothko

Until the modern world there are scarcely any great Jewish artists. But then suddenly, with expressionist and abstract painters there were many. But what made them Jewish? We will explore this question through the work of the marvelous Rothko multiforms and particularly those nine paintings created for the Seagrams Building that now hang at the Tate Modern in London. It is a fascinating journey.

Jump back to the full schedule

Dan RossI'm an Atheist and I Believe in God

In this session, we will confront contemporary atheist ideologies and their critiques of religion, as well as Jewish sources, traditional and modern, that open questions about the necessity (or lack thereof) of having a relationship with God. And in reflecting on the challenges surfaced in these texts, we will explore our personal beliefs and questions about the Divine

Jump back to the full schedule

Dr. Benjamin SommerWhat is Holiness? A מחלוקת לשם שמים (debate for the sake of heaven) between Leviticus and Deuteronomy

The books of Leviticus and Deuteronomy have very different ideas about what can be holy and how something or someone becomes holy. This difference, we will see, creates two different patterns of Jewish thought that persist into the present, and these patterns have important ethical and political implications for contemporary Jewry.

Jump back to the full schedule

Dena WeissWhat Goes Down Must Come Up: A New Map of Spiritual Progress

In this class we'll explore a teaching of R' Menachem Nachum of Chernobyl, a student of the Ba'al Shem Tov and author of the Me'or Einayim. His teaching presents a challenge to us to re-evaluate what we think of as spiritual and religious growth or proximity to the Divine. He suggests that by changing our spiritual trajectory and reorienting our internal notions of progress we can achieve much more and grow much further than we thought possible before.

Jump back to the full schedule

 

 

Kids' Programming

10am

3rd - 5th Graders

Beauty in Nature

Daniella Adler and Ruth Servi
(Schechter Manhattan)

 

  Drop off is at 9:55
Pickup is at 10:55 AM

K-2nd Graders

Experiencing Blessings of Nature

Rina Goldberg and Elisa Marcus
(Schechter Manhattan)

Drop off is at 9:55
Pickup is at 10:55 AM

Family Art Space

Schechter Manhattan alumni will be working with everyone who stops by to create a thematic art project

11am

K - 2nd Graders

Kindness is Beautiful

Daniella Adler and Ruth Servi
(Schechter Manhattan)

Drop off is at 10:55
Pickup is at 11:55 AM

3rd - 5th Graders

Inspired to Bless

Rina Goldberg and Elisa Marcus
(Schechter Manhattan)

Drop off is at 10:55
Pickup is at 11:55 AM
 11:50am Lunch Break
12:15pm 

K - 2nd Graders

Beautiful and less beautiful places in Israel

Itamar Gur
(UWS Shinshinim)

Drop off is at 12:10PM
Pickup is at 1:10 PM

3rd - 5th Graders

Is beauty in the eye of the beholder? Exploring Jewish Ethics

Esther Azar
(Shaare Zedek)

Drop off is at 12:10PM
Pickup is at 1:10 PM

Family Art Space

Schechter Manhattan alumni will be working with everyone who stops by to create a thematic art project

 

 

1:15pm

3rd - 5th Graders

Let’s make our world beautiful again, Israel as a case study

Itamar Gur
(UWS Shinshinim)

Drop off is at 1:10PM
Pickup is at 2:10 PM

K - 2nd Graders

Don't Judge a Book by its Cover: A multi-sensory exploration of the God Spark in all things

Esther Azar
(Shaare Zedek)

Drop off is at 1:10PM
Pickup is at 2:10 PM

 

Esther AzarIs beauty in the eye of the beholder? Exploring Jewish Ethics 3-5 graders

Can we judge things by the way they look? Can we find the God spark in things that appear ugly? Join Esther, the Director of Family Programmng at Shaare Zedek as we use our senses to explore our perceptions and how they effect our experience.

Jump back to the full schedule

K-2 Experiencing Blessings of Nature (10am)

In this session, children will think about all of the ways that the natural world inspires us and causes us to feel wonder and a sense of gratefulness. Children will engage in a multi-sensory activity culminating in the writing of their own blessings.

Beauty in Nature (3-5) (10am)

In this session children will do a text study from a short passage in Kohelet Rabbah, focusing on a description of Gan Eden. Children will then participate in a discussion and an activity on Tikkun Olam; exploring humanity's role in protecting the earth and how we can preserve the beauty of God's creation. 

Jump back to the full schedule

3-5 Lesson: Inspired to Bless (11am)

In this session, children will be introduced to several of the traditional birchot ha-nehenin (blessings of enjoyment) and consider what may have inspired their authors to write them. This study session will culminate with children writing their own blessings.

Jump back to the full schedule

Kindness is Beautiful (K-2) (11am)

In this session children will listen to a read aloud of Hannah's Sabbath Dress, by Itzhak Schweiger-Dmi'el. Children will then explore the connections between the concept of beauty and kindness through hands-on activities and a short discussion. 

Jump back to the full schedule | Click here to register