Learn with Hadar
Yeshivat Hadar In-Person Classes

 

The Beit Midrash of Yeshivat Hadar is open again for in-person learning in Elul and Fall 2022. Join our learning community and study Torah in all of its depth and splendor.

All classes will be held in Manhattan (Upper West Side), with exact locations to be announced. Proof of vaccination and booster is required for all students.

Note: tuition is waived for all Elul and Fall 2022 classes.

 

 


Elul Classes (Daytime)

 

Intermediate Talmud: New Moons, Repentance, and Sacred Booths
Rabbi Tali Adler

omer

When? Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9:00 AM-12:45 PM
Sept 12-Oct 3 (11 sessions)

What does repentance look like, and how do we achieve it? What makes a sukkah kosher, and why should I care? Intermediate Talmud is intended for students with prior experience studying Talmud in the original Hebrew/Aramaic, looking to take their skills to the next level and become more independent Talmud learners. The course covers selections from various tractates and it assumes knowledge with common terms and phrases, the ability to look up unfamiliar terms in the Jastrow dictionary, and familiarity with common forms of Talmudic argumentation. If you’re unsure whether this class is right for you, reach out to Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg. Participation in this class is contingent on a brief application and skills assessment.

APPLY

 

Introductory Talmud: New Moons, Repentance, and Sacred Booths
Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg

omer

When? Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00 AM-12:45 PM
Sept 13-29 (5 sessions)

What does repentance look like, and how do we achieve it? What makes a sukkah kosher, and why should I care? Introductory Talmud is intended for students who are able to decode Hebrew and with enough understanding of Hebrew grammar to independently look up words in the dictionary. The class will cover selections from various tractates with a focus on developing basic skills in understanding Talmudic passages, such as punctuation, translation, and describing the back-and-forth of the argument. If you’re unsure whether this class is right for you, reach out to Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg. Participation in this class is contingent on a brief application and skills assessment.

APPLY

 

Customs and Laws of the High Holidays
Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg

omer

When? Mondays, 9:00-10:45 AM
Sept 12-October 3 (3 sessions)

Between the shofar blowing and the fasting and the waving of palm fronds, the practices of the High Holidays can be overwhelming. In this class, we’ll study some essential details of these practices, with an eye toward not only understanding their history, but also toward making meaning of their details.

REGISTER

 

Praying Anew: Unlocking Meaning in the Words of the Mahzor
Rabbi Elie Kaunfer and Rabbi Aviva Richman

omer

When? Wednesdays, 9:00-10:45 AM
Sept 14-28 (3 sessions)

Prepare for the High Holidays by looking at critical areas of the liturgy. We will gain a deeper sense of the unique structure of these prayers, as well as look in-depth into specific prayers. We will delve into the biblical and rabbinic sources of these prayers, with an eye toward deeper meaning and connection to the larger themes of the holidays.

REGISTER

 

Mighty Mothers and Powerful Prophets: The Torah and Haftarah Readings of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
Rabbi Miriam-Simma Walfish

omer

When? Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00-12:45 PM
Sept 12-Oct 3 (6 sessions)

From Hagar’s crying out for her son Yishmael, to the prophet Isaiah castigating the people for their soulless fasting, the High Holidays feature some of the most intense, beautiful, and challenging readings of the liturgical year. We will examine these texts closely, both as independent works of literature and as part of the liturgy for the High Holidays.

REGISTER

 

 

Elul Classes (Evening)

 

Ahat Sha'alti: Song and Study for Elul
Rabbi Deborah Sacks Mintz

elie

When? Tuesdays, 7:30-8:45 PM
Sept 6-20 (3 sessions)

Recited each day of Elul and throughout the yamim noraim (Days of Awe), Psalm 27 serves as a core liturgical anchor of the season. Over the course of 3 sessions of singing and learning together, we'll root ourselves in both the soundscape and reflective potential of this important prayer. Join us and help create a unique space of song, spirituality, and connection as we prepare for the High Holidays together. Light refreshments will be served at 7:00 PM.

REGISTER

 

Tales of a Tortured Prophet: Re-Reading the Book of Jonah
Rabbi Shai Held

Goldie

When? Wednesdays, 7:30-8:45 PM
Sept 7-21 (3 Sessions)

Jonah, a book we read on Yom Kippur and think we know well, is actually quite elusive. It tells the story of that very rare prophet who actually succeeds at his mission - and is infuriated by that fact. And whereas some biblical characters get angry at God when God fails to live up to God's character, Jonah fumes at God for being exactly who God says God is. In this series, we'll do a close literary and theological reading of Jonah, paying close attention both to the ways the text conveys meaning and raises major ethical and theological questions. Light refreshments will be served at 7:00 PM.

REGISTER

 
 
 

Fall Classes

 

Intermediate Talmud: Can the Ends Justify the Means?
Dena Weiss

elie

When? Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9:00-12:45 AM
Oct 24-Dec 22

Is it possible to fulfill a mitzvah with ill-gotten goods? At what point, if any, does thievery become so entrenched that it becomes possible to recognize legally?
Intermediate Talmud is intended for students with prior experience studying Talmud in the original Hebrew/Aramaic, looking to take their skills to the next level and become more independent Talmud learners. The course assumes knowledge with common terms and phrases, the ability to look up unfamiliar terms in the Jastrow dictionary, and familiarity with common forms of Talmudic argumentation. If you’re unsure whether this class is right for you, reach out to Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg. Participation in this class is contingent on a brief application and skills assessment. The application will open in the coming weeks.

 

Introductory Talmud: Can the Ends Justify the Means?
Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg

Goldie

When? Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00 AM-12:45 PM
Oct 25-Dec 22

Is it possible to fulfill a mitzvah with ill-begotten goods? At what point, if any, does thievery become so entrenched that it becomes possible to recognize legally?
Introductory Talmud is intended for students who are able to decode Hebrew and with enough understanding of Hebrew grammar to independently look up words in the dictionary. The class will focus on developing basic skills in understanding Talmudic passages, such as punctuation, translation, and describing the back-and-forth of the argument. If you’re unsure whether this class is right for you, reach out to Rabbi Micha’el Rosenberg. Participation in this class is contingent on a brief application and skills assessment. The application will open in the coming weeks.

 

Making Sense of Jewish Practice: An Introduction to Practical Halakhah
Rabbi Miriam-Simma Walfish

omer

When? Mondays, 9:00-10:45 AM
Oct 24-Dec 19

We will take a tour of some of the core elements of Jewish ritual law – prayer, Shabbat, and kashrut – and explore the processes through which legal rulings developed. We will also consider the tensions and disputes that get at the heart of what each area of law is about.
Registration will open in the coming weeks.

 

Praying Anew: Unlocking Meaning in the Words of the Siddur
Rabbi Elie Kaunfer

Elie

When? Wednesdays, 9-10:45
Oct 26-Dec 21

The Jewish prayerbook is a collage of texts that reflect our deepest emotions, longings, and experiences. But sometimes it takes some work to unlock this meaning. Together, we will interpret the texts of our prayers, uncovering new insights and learning a method of understanding the prayerbook in a new way.
Registration will open in the coming weeks.

 
 

Origins: Introduction to the Study of Humash
Rabbi Tali Adler

omer

When? Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM-12:45 PM
Oct 24-Dec 21

What are the fundamental cracks in the foundation of the world, making it the painful place it so often is? How do we account for God’s choice of a particular people in the midst of all humankind? Where did our people originate, and how did we transform from a fractured family into the beginnings of a people? Join us as we study the book of Bereishit with an eye towards how it addresses these questions and more. This class will use methods including close reading of the text and analysis of traditional and contemporary commentaries. All texts will be provided in translation, with short portions of each week devoted to working through smaller pieces of text in the original.
Registration will open in the coming weeks.

 
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER FOR UPDATES
FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA